LEXINGTON -- Lexington brothers Evan and Quincy Winkler both recently earned the highest possible composite score of 36 on their ACT.

Evan, 16, is a junior at Henry Clay High School and Quincy, 15, is a sophomore at Henry Clay. They are the sons of University of Kentucky physicians Kim Thompson and Michael Winkler. Evan took the test in June and Quincy in July.

Only around two-tenths of 1 percent of students who take the ACT earn a top score. In the United States high school graduating class of 2018, only 3,741 out of more than 1.9 million graduates who took the ACT earned a top composite score of 36, ACT officials said in letter sent to the brothers.

"They work really hard," said Thompson, their mother. "They are competitive. They are very conscientious and very driven."

"Both of them were diagnosed with autism when they were toddlers and they have had to work really hard to prove themselves," Thompson said. "It's just a real testimony to having high expectations for kids with disabilities and their teachers have always believed in them. Obviously we have, (as) their parents."

The ACT consists of tests in English, mathematics, reading and science, each scored on a scale of 1-36. A student's composite score is the average of the four test scores.

The score for ACT's optional writing test is reported separately and is not included within the ACT composite score.

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