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Nephew lucky after motorcycle wreck

By SUSAN ESTRICH Creators Syndicate

Maddie's Room is actually very nice - comfortable chairs, lots of outlets. If you don't look closely, you might think you're at an airport lounge, except I'm the only one who appears to be working.

Everybody else is just waiting.

This is the surgical waiting room at UCLA Ronald Reagan Hospital. I am sitting with my sister, and with my nephew's girlfriend, while my nephew undergoes surgery on his crushed leg.

No, don't feel sorry for us. My nephew might just be the luckiest guy in this building. He was riding his motorcycle to work on Monday morning, on the freeway, when he was hit by a car that suddenly switched lanes.

When I found him here in the ER on Monday, after a series of panicked calls, he was in great pain. His broken leg was elevated. And every nurse and doctor who walked into his cubicle said the same thing that I did when I saw him: "You are so lucky."

I know many people love motorcycles. My nephew was one of them. I expect I will hear from many of them, who will tell me that they ride safely, that it's motorists who need to share the road and not motorcyclists who need to abandon it. Sorry. After a day in Maddie's Room and a week here at this fine hospital, you're not going to convince me - or any of the doctors I've talked to.

The statistics I could find may explain why. According to 2006 statistics from the government, roughly 13 cars per 100,000 end up in fatal crashes; the equivalent statistics for motorcycles were 72 per 100,000. On a per-mile-traveled basis, the risk of a fatal crash is 35 times greater for motorcycles than cars. While the number of fatalities dipped slightly in 2005, it was headed back up in 2011 and up again in 2012. The motorists are more often to blame than the cyclists, but so what? The cyclists die. As for accidents and injuries, it's harder to find good numbers, but common sense, and the experience of the professionals here, suggests that people riding around in the open air who get hit by thousands of tons of metal and steel don't fare as well as those who are inside those vehicles and cushioned by air bags in every direction.

Years ago, when my children were small, an older mother taught me a lesson I never forgot: If you make a lot of rules, she said, it's too easy for your kids to break one, and once they break one, the rules aren't really rules. So keep the list short and absolute.

I asked her what her list was, and she replied almost automatically: No heroin. No motorcycles. I added drunk drivers.

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