Welcome

Thank you for visiting paducahsun.com, the online home of The Paducah Sun.

Calendar
June 2012
S M T W T F S
27 28 29 30 31 01 02

Click here to submit an event.

Illinois DNR seeks maps of old underground mines

By TAMMY WEBBERAssociated Press

CHICAGO - When an interstate bridge between Springfield and Champaign began to sink three years ago, the cause was quickly identified: An old coal mine 220 feet below the surface was starting to give way. Engineers backfilled the mine to prevent the bridge from collapsing.

In 2009, a 7-year-old elementary school in southern Illinois that was built over an old mine developed large cracks and the floors buckled, displacing hundreds of students until a new school could be built on another site - after tens of thousands of cubic yards of backfill was pumped hundreds of feet below the surface to ensure it was stable.

The incidents underscore the potential - and literal - pitfalls of building throughout much of Illinois, where more than 100 years of coal mining carved out vast swaths underground.

Now, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources is seeking the public's help to find old maps of long-closed and sometimes-forgotten mines to help prevent similar problems.

The southern two-thirds of Illinois - about 75 of its 102 counties - was mined for coal to various degrees starting in the mid-1800s. Almost all of have been closed or abandoned.

Over time, timbers that support mine roofs can decay and break or the pillars of remaining coal can get pushed into the mine floor, causing holes to form at the surface or the ground to sag - conditions known as "subsidence," said Robert Gibson, the emergency section supervisor at the DNR's Department of Mines and Minerals.

Mine maps marked the locations of rooms, pillars and shafts - a necessity then and a valuable tool for state officials, homeowners and developers today.

But the DNR only has about 2,000 maps for more than 4,000 mines, Gibson said, and each map may have multiple segments.

The state is digitizing those in its archives before they deteriorate, but also is searching for missing maps. Some have been discovered in historical societies, libraries and mining company archives.

Many may be in people's homes, Gibson said.

"I have been called to look at subsidence where the homeowner had a mine map in their barn that was not in our collection," Gibson said. "Maybe their fathers or grandfathers worked there, and their descendants acquired them."

Comments made about this article - 0 Total

Comment on this article

Your comment has been submitted for approval
captcha 098599ff942e4dd7b619a31058b2eb42
Top Classifieds
  • 10 week old German ShepherdsFully Vet ... Details
  • PILLOWTOP Mattress Sets, NEW in plast ... Details
  • RUNNING, fixable, junk vehicles, equi ... Details
  • New Custom Homes Marshall Co. Low 2&a ... Details
  • 3BR/1BA brick home/3.8 acres, 2424 Gr ... Details
  • SEEING is believing! Don't buy p ... Details
  • Lake Front Home 3,000 sq. ft., Kuttaw ... Details
  • 2005 Ford Taurus, 115k miles, exc. co ... Details
This Week In Photos
Most Popular
  1. 15 stores distribute to minor
  2. Taco Bell, Pizza Hut: Ingredients getting booted
  3. INSENSITIVE? WHO says be careful what you call those bugs
  1. Boy struck by car, thrown 30 feet
  2. 15 stores distribute to minor
  3. IRS: Hackers stole tax info
  1. 15 stores distribute to minor
  2. Taco Bell, Pizza Hut: Ingredients getting booted
  3. INSENSITIVE? WHO says be careful what you call those bugs
Discussion

Check out these recently discussed stories and voice your opinion...