Thank you for visiting paducahsun.com, the online home of The Paducah Sun.

June 2012
27 28 29 30 31 01 02

Click here to submit an event.

Illinois House advances scaled-back '15 budget


SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - Having given up on extending Illinois' temporary income tax increase - at least for now - the Illinois Legislature is moving forward with a scaled-back budget that could lead to layoffs, further delays in paying the state's bills and a post-election vote to make the tax hike permanent or generate some other source of revenue.

The House on Tuesday approved the approximately $35.7 billion 2015 spending plan, which key Democrats acknowledge relies on some of the same practices that got Illinois into financial trouble in the first place. That includes not allocating enough money to cover expenses, using money from special funds for day-to-day operations and banking on future increases in revenue that may or may not materialize.

"We are kicking the can down the road," said state Sen. Heather Steans, a Chicago Democrat and a lead budget negotiator.

The plan now goes to the Senate, where it's expected to be approved before the Democrat-controlled Legislature must adjourn for the session on Saturday.

Lawmakers drafted the plan after House Speaker Michael Madigan announced his chamber had given up on extending a temporary income tax increase that Democrats approved in 2011. The increase - which cost the typical taxpayer $1,100 last year - is set to roll back from 5 percent to 3.75 percent for individuals on Jan. 1. That will lead to a $1.8 billion drop in revenue next year.

Madigan, Gov. Pat Quinn and Senate President John Cullerton all were pushing to make the higher rate permanent, but Democrats in the House - where all members are up for re-election in November - couldn't garner enough "yes" votes. The chamber last week also overwhelmingly rejected a so-called doomsday budget that would have cut funding to schools and other areas.

Quinn's office called the spending plan that advanced Tuesday "incomplete."

"The budget doesn't avoid the tough decisions. It just postpones them," said his spokeswoman, Brooke Anderson.

The budget keeps funding for education and most state agencies flat next year. Without money for increased costs, lawmakers said it's likely that agencies such as human services, corrections and Illinois State Police will have to lay off staff. Anders Lindall, a spokesman for the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, said the budget would "force a cascade of negative consequences," including possible facility closures.

Comments made about this article - 0 Total

Comment on this article

Your comment has been submitted for approval
captcha ebbfe3dfe3fe47c0886075bb3e4bbabc
Top Classifieds
  • HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised, Best H ... Details
  • Adorable Puppies Yorkie Mix. Tails &# ... Details
  • 2 year old female yellow lab, registe ... Details
  • PILLOW TOPmattress sets NEW in plasti ... Details
  • RUNNING, fixable, junk vehicles, equi ... Details
  • Hummel Figurines, Bells & Platesi ... Details
  • Cash for farms & gold (270)339-8 ... Details
  • OWN YOUR OWN HOME -AS LOW AS $500 DO ... Details
  • SEEING is believing! Don't b ... Details
  • 3 BD, 2.5 BA, 1900 sq ft, 1 mi. from ... Details
  • Details
  • FAIRHURST BLDG.295 sq. ft. office1900 ... Details
  • 2012 Honda Civic EX-L sedan 4 dr. 70K ... Details
This Week In Photos
Most Popular
  1. Rain to fade starting Tuesday
  2. Officer killed during clinic shooting was pastor, figure skater
  3. Putin orders sanctions against Turkey
  1. Out of town couple finds hospitality in Paducah
  2. High risk of texting on the road
  3. McCracken District Court
  1. ASSIST Let's weigh options on riverfront funds
  2. Rain to fade starting Tuesday
  3. Officer killed during clinic shooting was pastor, figure skater

Check out these recently discussed stories and voice your opinion...