Welcome

Thank you for visiting paducahsun.com, the online home of The Paducah Sun.

Calendar
June 2012
S M T W T F S
27 28 29 30 31 01 02

Click here to submit an event.

Bill taking aim at heroin clears Kentucky Senate

FRANKFORT - The Kentucky Senate passed a bill Thursday to combat a deadly surge in heroin addiction, a trend blamed for devastating families while putting a burden on courts and police in hard-hit areas.

The measure, a mix of additional treatment for addicts and harsher punishment for higher-volume heroin dealers, cleared the Senate on a 36-0 vote.

It came on the same day that a Senate committee reviewing the measure was urged to take action by a judge, a nurse, a police chief and the father of a man who died of a heroin overdose.

The scope of the problem is statewide, but Kentucky's northernmost counties situated near Cincinnati have been especially hard hit by the rise in heroin addiction.

"Overdoses have become a daily occurrence in northern Kentucky," said Senate President Pro Tem Katie Stine, a northern Kentucky Republican and the bill's lead sponsor. "Heroin has overwhelmed our court system, jails, police departments and social service networks."

The bill now heads to the House, where the measure's leading supporter is House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Tilley, a Hopkinsville Democrat.

Gov. Steve Beshear and Attorney General Jack Conway also have urged action. Beshear noted in his recent State of the Commonwealth speech that overdose deaths involving heroin rose from 22 across Kentucky in 2011 to 170 in the first nine months of 2013.

The bill calls for tougher punishment for higher-volume heroin traffickers. They would have to serve more of their prison sentences before becoming eligible for parole.

They currently have to serve up to one-fifth of their sentences before reaching parole eligibility. The bill would require them to serve at least half their sentences before becoming parole eligible.

Campbell District Judge Karen Thomas said heroin addiction is "a true crisis" in her part of northern Kentucky, and she urged tough action against dealers.

"If we don't cut the head off that snake, deal with that trafficking issue, we will be inundated with this problem for quite a long time," Thomas told the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

On the treatment side, the bill would require the Kentucky Medicaid program to pay for a range of substance-abuse treatment. It also would direct that part of the money saved from the state's 2011 corrections reform law be used to fund treatment and anti-drug education programs.

The bill also seeks to increase the availability of a drug that can help reverse the effects of heroin overdoses.

Comments made about this article - 0 Total

Comment on this article

Your comment has been submitted for approval
captcha 666e55ac87f6421184f596a68f61e328
Top Classifieds
  • AKC Papered Lab Pups For Sale! 7 week ... Details
  • PILLOWTOP Mattress Sets, NEW in plast ... Details
  • RUNNING, fixable, junk vehicles, equi ... Details
  • Corner Lot, 1 acre Kevil $16,500 2704 ... Details
  • SEEING is believing! Don't buy p ... Details
  • 1963 Chev. Bel-Air, 2 dr post, 327 5 ... Details
  • StarCraft V-bottom 16 ft. wide & ... Details
This Week In Photos
Most Popular
  1. Readers would welcome more human interest stories
  2. EXAMPLE? Syria deal outcome not a good sign
  3. On television
  1. Readers would welcome more human interest stories
  2. Mother aims to help victims of violence
  3. WKCTC offering students financial management aid
  1. Readers would welcome more human interest stories
  2. EXAMPLE? Syria deal outcome not a good sign
  3. On television
Discussion

Check out these recently discussed stories and voice your opinion...