Welcome

Thank you for visiting paducahsun.com, the online home of The Paducah Sun.

Calendar
June 2012
S M T W T F S
27 28 29 30 31 01 02

Click here to submit an event.

A community changed forever

Associated Press

DARRINGTON, Wash. - The search by heavy equipment, dogs and bare hands for victims from the deadly Washington mudslide was going "all the way to the dirt" as crews looked for anything to provide answers for family and friends a week after a small mountainside community was destroyed.

All work on the debris field halted briefly Saturday for a moment of silence to honor those lost. Gov. Jay Inslee had asked people across Washington to pause at 10:37 a.m., the time the huge slide struck on March 22, destroying a neighborhood in the community of Oso north of Seattle. Authorities say they have found at least 25 bodies and 90 remain missing.

"People all over stopped work - all searchers - in honor of that moment, so people we are searching for know we are serious," Snohomish County Fire District 1 battalion chief Steve Mason said.

An American flag had been run up a tree and then down to half-staff at the debris site, he said.

Dan Rankin, mayor of the nearby logging town of Darrington, said the community had been "changed forevermore."

"It's going to take a long time to heal, and the likelihood is we will probably never be whole," he said.

Among the dozens of missing are a man in his early 20s, Adam Farnes, and his mother, Julie.

"He was a giant man with a giant laugh," Kellie Howe said of Farnes. Howe became friends with him when he moved to the area from Alaska. She said Adam Farnes was the kind of guy who would come into your house and help you do the dishes.

Adam Farnes also played the banjo, drums and bass guitar, she said, and had worked as a telephone lineman and a 911 dispatcher.

"He loved his music loud," she said. "They still have not found him or his mom. They're going through a hard time right now."

Finding and identifying all the victims could stretch on for a very long time, and authorities have warned that not everyone may ultimately be accounted for after one of the deadliest landslides in U.S. history.

Rescuers have given a cursory look at the entire debris field 55 miles northeast of Seattle, said Steve Harris, division supervisor for the eastern incident management team. They are now sifting through the rest of the fragments, looking for places where dogs should give extra attention. Only "a very small percentage" has received the more thorough examination, he said.

Comments made about this article - 0 Total

Comment on this article

Your comment has been submitted for approval
captcha 7b8615f66a404c1f8567cea77063f06d
Top Classifieds
  • HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised, Best H ... Details
  • Cocker Spaniel Pup - AKC (270)476-258 ... Details
  • PILLOW TOPmattress sets NEW in plasti ... Details
  • Pride Lift Chair Like new, $500 270- ... Details
  • Mature Professional Seeks to rent hou ... Details
  • Hummel Figurines & Plates, Carniv ... Details
  • Pride lift chair, excellent working c ... Details
  • Cash for farms & gold (270)339-8 ... Details
  • RUNNING, fixable, junk vehicles, equi ... Details
  • 4010 Maxon Rd. 1.33 Acres, 4 BD. 3.5 ... Details
  • 185 AC. ESTATE Rolling hills, l ... Details
  • 16x80 2 bd., 2 b, Call for info. $17 ... Details
  • SEEING is believing! Don't buy p ... Details
  • 2000 Dutchman 20 ft Pop-up Camper. Ve ... Details
  • FOR SALE: 2012 Hyundai Santa Fe SUV 4 ... Details
  • Ford Mustang '04 V6 78k $4,900 2 ... Details
  • FOR SALE: 1993 Honda GL1500AP Goldwin ... Details
  • JOE'S BACKHOE SERVICE Install &a ... Details
This Week In Photos
Most Popular
  1. Tilghman unable to stop Bruin run attack
  2. On television
  3. Correction
  1. Stock market ends turbulent week on more placid note
  2. Quilts of Valor exhibit honors veterans
  3. Police limiting I-24 traffic today
  1. Tilghman unable to stop Bruin run attack
  2. On television
  3. Correction
Discussion

Check out these recently discussed stories and voice your opinion...