Welcome

Thank you for visiting paducahsun.com, the online home of The Paducah Sun.

Calendar
June 2012
S M T W T F S
27 28 29 30 31 01 02

Click here to submit an event.

Wood burning rule prompts rural backlash

BY DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - A federal proposal to clean up the smoke wafting from wood-burning stoves has sparked a backlash from some rural residents, lawmakers and manufacturers who fear it could close the damper on one of the oldest ways of warming homes on cold winter days.

Proposed regulations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency would significantly reduce the amount of particle pollution allowed from the smokestacks of new residential wood-powered heaters.

Wood-burning stoves are a staple in rural homes in many states, a cheap heating source for low-income residents and others wanting to lessen their reliance on gas or electric furnaces. Outdoor models often cost several thousand dollars, but indoor stoves can cost as little as a few hundred dollars and sometimes double as fashionable centerpieces in homes.

Some manufacturers contend the EPA's proposed standards are so stringent that the higher production costs would either force them out of business or raise prices so high that many consumers could no longer afford their products.

"There's not a stove in the United States that can pass the test right now - this is the death knoll of any wood burning," Reg Kelly, the founder of Earth Outdoor Furnaces in Mountain Grove, told Missouri lawmakers during a recent hearing.

More than three dozen Missouri lawmakers have co-sponsored a bill that would symbolically fight back against the EPA by declaring that "All Missourians have a right to heat their homes and businesses using wood-burning furnaces, stoves, fireplaces and heaters."

The EPA's existing regulations date to 1988 and don't apply to all of the different kinds of wood-burning devices now in use. Under a proposed rule change released last month, the EPA would give manufacturers five years to meet standards that would reduce emissions by an estimated 80 percent.

Comments made about this article - 0 Total

Comment on this article

Your comment has been submitted for approval
captcha 8c62529dba6341b49821c69721df38eb
Top Classifieds
  • Pugs Registered. Black, Female. Shot ... Details
  • AKC Lab Pups *3/Black female $375 *1 ... Details
  • CKC Tiny Toy Poodles270-554-4308 Details
  • F1 Golden Doodles M/F, Beautiful,6 wk ... Details
  • MJS Concrete Specializing In:Stamped ... Details
  • RUNNING, fixable, junk vehicles, equi ... Details
  • JOHN DEERE Riding Mower ... Details
  • PILLOWTOP Mattress Sets, NEW in plast ... Details
  • Details
  • ASPHALT & CONCRETE REPAIR, SEALIN ... Details
  • Lakewood Villa Condo for Sale - 2460 ... Details
  • NEW 50x60 steel bldg. equipped w/12x1 ... Details
  • SEEING is believing! Don't buy p ... Details
  • 8 Unit Apt. Bldgs. For Sale By Owner ... Details
  • Corner Lot, 1 acre Kevil $16,500 2704 ... Details
  • For Sale/Lease Deerview Estates (Calv ... Details
  • Duplex By Owner 3 BR 1 BA each side ... Details
  • Chrome Running Boards $300270-331-76 ... Details
  • StarCraft V-bottom 16 ft. wide & ... Details
  • 39' Heartland Landmark 4 Slides ... Details
  • JOE'S BACKHOESERVICE Install &am ... Details
  • 1963 Chev. Bel-Air, 2 dr post, 327 5 ... Details
This Week In Photos
Most Popular
  1. U of L trustees give big to Beshear causes
  2. 'LIVE on the RIVER' teams with truck pull
  3. Campus officer pleads not guilty in shooting
  1. Girl's body found in Ballard pond
  2. One man shot at Noble Park
  3. Newborn baby found in dumpster
  1. U of L trustees give big to Beshear causes
  2. 'LIVE on the RIVER' teams with truck pull
  3. Campus officer pleads not guilty in shooting
Discussion

Check out these recently discussed stories and voice your opinion...