We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!

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MIAMI - Dr. Camillo Ricordi considers himself a diabetes freedom fighter.

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Almost anyone would benefit by reducing the amount of fat in their diet. But the upside could be especially big for women with breast cancer.

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ST. LOUIS - Carly Richmeyer, 32, can move again without her back torturing her to be still. More than that, she's back to exercising, standing more than she sits and making plans for her June wedding.

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For the first time in two decades, a new treatment has been shown to limit the damage from a common type of stroke. Researchers in the Netherlands found that mechanically removing a clot in addition to using a standard clot-busting medicine lowered the risk that a stroke sufferer would end u…

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Once again, there's proof that using your noggin to work hard pays handsome dividends - this time, in protecting brainpower as you age. And once again, research is underscoring that for brains, too, you either use it or lose it.

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BASTROP, Texas - Some say it's the hardest thing they have ever had to hear, but for Shelley Crenshaw, three-time breast cancer survivor and Bastrop resident, it was a blessing.

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Maybe it's stress eating, or sheer boredom, or the fact that one of your co-workers brings in killer homemade baked goods seemingly every day, but opportunities for unhealthy grazing abound in most office environments.

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Maybe it's stress eating, or sheer boredom, or the fact that one of your co-workers brings in killer homemade baked goods seemingly every day, but opportunities for unhealthy grazing abound in most office environments.

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McHENRY, Ill.  - Sitting in a hospital bed at Centegra Hospital-McHenry, a hospital chaplain walked 84-year-old Teresa Guardi through the different life-sustaining measures the hospital can take - ventilators, dialysis, CPR and feeding tubes.

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When facing a plethora of options in grocery stores - in the dairy aisle and among various plant-based alternatives - deciding what milk to buy can give a shopper pause.

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For much of his 20-year career as a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, Anthony J. Sciscione has been criticizing something obstetricians routinely prescribe to try to prevent premature birth: bed rest.

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MINNEAPOLIS - Cesarean delivery rates vary significantly from one hospital to another - a fact that has many obstetricians on the defensive as the government strives to drive down America's relatively high rate of the costly and risky procedures.

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NEW YORK - Doctors in many U.S. hospitals are unnecessarily prescribing multiple antibiotics for several days when just one would do the job, a new study suggests.

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NEW YORK - Overdose deaths from powerful painkillers are still rising in the U.S., but not like they used to - probably because of new restrictions on methadone, according to government scientists.

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Although the thought of sleeping with millions of dust mites - microscopic arachnids that feast on flakes of skin - is just plain gross, it's something most people can handle without worry. After all, our bodies are inhabited by multitudes of bacteria, to which we seldom give a thought.

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WASHINGTON - Some current or former heavy smokers may benefit from a new lung cancer test even if they're 65 or older - although they experience more false alarms, suggests an analysis that comes as Medicare is debating whether to pay for the scans.

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When a person suddenly loses the ability to speak or to understand what others are saying, the hardships that cascade from that loss can be overwhelming - from the seemingly trite to the devastatingly depressing.

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LOS ANGELES - When you buy a box of crackers labeled "natural," do you just assume they're organic? Don't. When you choose an "all natural" chocolate syrup for your kids' ice cream, are you thinking it has less sugar? Read the label.

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PAWTUCKET, R.I.  - About 11 years ago, Dighton's Mike Quaglia started noticing that his hands would start to shake when he reached out his arm to pick something up.

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WASHINGTON - Sometime in elementary school, you quit counting your fingers and just know the answer. Now scientists have put youngsters into brain scanners to find out why, and watched how the brain reorganizes itself as kids learn math.

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A free supply of nicotine replacement medication and a handful of automated phone calls made smokers who wanted to quit much more likely to succeed, according to results of a clinical trial published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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WASHINGTON  - Americans consider insurance and a good bedside manner in choosing a doctor, but will that doctor provide high-quality care? A new poll shows that people don't know how to determine that.

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What's the best way to boost your metabolism and burn more fat? That's the holy grail for metabolic researchers and for many Americans. Orlando, Florida, scientists are at the forefront of some of the most promising research in the field.

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WASHINGTON - There is no concussion-proof football helmet, but manufacturers may soon have to meet new testing standards against certain concussion-causing forces - a step in the quest for more protection.

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MINNEAPOLIS - Paul Wild has been a reliable research volunteer at the University of Minnesota for 20 years, participating in two landmark studies that changed the standard of care for diabetes, a disease that afflicts more than 24 million Americans.

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A new school year is just around the corner. Soon parents will be juggling school supply lists, registration, and back-to-school shopping, but is your child medically prepared for the upcoming year?

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CHICAGO  - Two years ago, Arrica Wallace was riddled with tumors from widely spread cervical cancer that the strongest chemotherapy and radiation could not beat back. Today, the Kansas mother shows no signs of the disease, and it was her own immune system that made it go away.

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Taking care of a sick child can be stressful, especially when you do not know exactly what is ailing him or her. Parents are placed in a difficult situation between the fine line of taking precautions and overreacting.

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KANSAS CITY, Mo. - In May, a 29-year-old Kansas City woman fell asleep in her bed with her three children, including a 6-month-old boy. When she awoke about six hours later, she found his lifeless body at the foot of her bed, under a cover.

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WASHINGTON  - How old is too old for a colonoscopy? A surprising number of people older than 75 haven't ever been screened for colon cancer - and researchers reported Monday that it's not too late for them to get caught up.

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TRENTON, N.J.  - For decades, seasonal allergy sufferers had two therapy options to ease the misery of hay fever. They could swallow pills or squirt nasal sprays every day for brief reprieves from the sneezing and itchy eyes. Or they could get allergy shots for years to gradually reduce thei…

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 Have you ever wanted to lose weight, quit smoking or conquer depression? It's tough to scale these health issues that challenge us. After all, it takes a lot of determination to become healthier.

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WASHINGTON  - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

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PITTSBURGH - Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine are studying the most effective means of treating chronic low back pain and symptoms of depression  in those 60 or older.

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As people bask in the warmth of spring and summer days, remembering to protect skin from the sun's ultraviolet rays can keep prolonged fun in the sun from causing sunburns and skin cancer.

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AUSTIN, Texas - Jaime Morin, 9, was diagnosed with autism at age 2 and has been nonverbal his whole life. When the therapy he was receiving at school became insufficient, his mother, Lupe Santander, sent him to Big Sky Pediatric Therapy, where he went for speech and occupational therapy once…

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LONDON  - For the first time ever, the World Health Organization has declared the spread of polio an international public health emergency that could grow in the next few months and unravel the nearly three-decade effort to eradicate the crippling disease.

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CHICAGO  - A new study suggests that in a single year, up to 42 percent of Medicare patients got at least one medical procedure they didn't need - overtreatment that cost as much as $8 billion.